Is East-West migration good for economic convergence in Europe?

Yes
82% (119 votes)
No
18% (26 votes)
Total votes: 145

Comments

In opinia mea migratia Est-Vest prezinta avantaje cat si dezavantaje. Avantajul este valorificat de tarile vestice deoarece fiind mai dezvoltate si atrag forta de munca din Est, persoane ce doresc sa isi creeze un trai mai bun. Dezavantajul este resimtit de tarile mai putin dezvoltate, pai precis estul Europei, deoarece majoritatea tinerilor cu studii sau nu prefera sa plece in strainatate deoarece acolo le este recunoscuta adevarata valoare, iar oportunitatile pe plan financiar sunt mai crescute.
Total votes: 10
Peer vote

În ultimii ani s-a constatat că relativa prosperitate economică şi stabilitate politică din UE au exercitat un efect de atracţie major asupra migraţiei internaţionale. Se observă o creştere a numărului de locuitori din Uniunea Europeană. În concluzie, se observă că fluxurile de migraţii majore, predominănd numărul imigranţilor, se produc în ţările cele mai dezvoltate din punct de vedere economic şi stabile din punct de vedere politic din UE.
Total votes: 8
Peer vote

At such a moment when migration is one of the most pulsatile points of the European Union's agenda, the apparent economic and integration approach of the countries of Eastern Europe is fragile. Initially, the idea of migration was welcomed by European society amidst problems such as the aging population, economic growth, emerging in a later situation of over-saturation due to the wave of refugees. This is not, of course, the way in which developing countries in the European Union can take their seats on the scene of great powers. Especially when the number of emigrants from Eastern European states is growing every hour, leaving a financial and social weakened state. The unprecedented situation does not improve European prospects for developing countries, but it also has some financial advantages, such as remittances that, in the case of Romania, represent a significant percentage of GDP. These waves of emigrants isolate the state itself, although at first sight, it would be expected to develop what would be called European opportunities. I think this problem could be solved if the European Union would its strategy in which the states are divided on several levels, and the West would know the problems of the East and the North would know the problems of the South.
Total votes: 8
Peer vote

This depends on immigrants. The answer can be yes and no. If migrants are settled in the host country, they will help develop the economy by virtue of their skills and filling a place in the economy. If this individual would return to its home country and engage in economic activity with his hard earned money abroad then it will help its home-economy, thus helping convergence. There is also another factor, the fact that by leaving his home country in search of a high-paid wage abroad, he is unknowingly decreasing the competition present in its home country which promotes better wages by the demand and supply rationale. Investing the money obtained into a business will also help the economy by producing jobs and transactions, increasing the opportunities, and in time lessening the temptation of working abroad for a better life.
Total votes: 11
Peer vote

East-West migration is good for economic convergence in Europe. The process of migration no matter how controversial is from a political point of view and from a mostly nationalist view makes sense economically. Europe faces a major demographic challenge: the population is aging, and, in many countries, shrinking, so it is common sense that new workers are welcomed in the West to keep up the economic growth. Moreover, beyond demographics, migration could also improve Europe’s economic performance over the medium-to-long-term in a number of ways, both high and low-skilled workers who migrate bring benefits to their new home countries by increasing income per person and living standards. High-skilled migrants bring diverse talent and expertise, while low-skilled migrants fill essential occupations for which natives are in short supply and allow natives to be employed at higher-skilled jobs. Gains are broadly shared by the population, so it may be well-worth shouldering the short-term costs to help integrate these new workers.
Total votes: 10
Peer vote

What is "convergence"? What does that word mean and how does it relate to your answer above?
Total votes: 2
Peer vote

The economic convergence concept means that poorer economies will tend to grow at faster rates than richer economies, it is also known as the catch-up effect. What I meant by my comment is that this convergence influences the economy of the EU in a good way through young people from poorer eastern countries that go in the western countries, where the salaries are much higher, then return or send money that will be spent at home, thus the economy of the poorer country will face a spontaneous growth that usually is higher than those of the richer countries, and overall creating a balanced economies.
Total votes: 5
Peer vote

So you say now that convergence means that poorer economies grow faster than richer ones or, what is the same, richer economies grow more slowly than poorer ones. And in your first answer you said that migration favours convergence, but you dedicate your answer exclusively to stress the benefits of immigration for richer host economies. Isn't there a contradiction here? If the concept of convergence requires that rich economies grow more slowly than poorer ones, how can you support your claim that there is convergence by showing how much the rich benefit?
Total votes: 2
Peer vote

Given that the East-West migration has benefited the European Union as a whole, there is a case for better redistributing the gains. For example, the size and composition of the European Union structural and cohesion funds—transfers from wealthier to poorer European Union regions—could explicitly account for the negative effects of emigration on sending countries’ economic potential. This would also be consistent with the European Union’s goal of reducing economic and social disparities across regions and promoting sustainable development.
Total votes: 8
Peer vote

Does this answer the question?
Total votes: 0
Peer vote