Can Brexit start a trade war between the UK and the EU?

Only if the UK leaves the customs union and makes a trade deal with an EU competitor such as the US or China.
15% (5 votes)
Only if the UK leaves the single market and becomes a low-tax deregulated "Singapore-on-Thames" that competes with the EU.
3% (1 vote)
No, because such a war would not be in the interests of anyone.
79% (26 votes)
No, because both the UK and the EU are democratic, and democracies do not fight each other.
3% (1 vote)
Total votes: 33

Comments

In my opinion is that the trade agreement between the UK and the EU is free in every sense of the word: investment, immigration, goods and most services, including finance, while the United Kingdom would likely be negotiating with the United States a trade agreement that covers goods and only partial service agreements, with very little immigration, "said Pickering. Thus , the main advantages enjoyed by the United Kingdom - attracting a lot of FDI (foreign direct investment) from Europe, a large influx of European workers boosting the workforce - would not be offset by an agreement trade with the United States, he added, in short, the risk of a trade war between the United States and the United Kingdom is low but not impossible
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Total votes: 22
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Brexit is defined as the UK's exit from the European Union, so this exit is not without consequences for the countries of the European Union. Can we speak of a trade war between the United Kingdom and the EU? Although the Brexit agreement is advantageous for both parties on the one hand, on the other hand, it is additional pressure for European countries, notably Germany, which is taking on all this weight. Also Great Britain will do everything to optimize its production and make its economic situation. This makes the Kingdom and Germany, for example, a good competitor. The United Kingdom will compete with the countries of the EU
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Total votes: 19
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From my point of view, Brexit can trigger a trade war between the UK and the EU in a context where the interests of the two parties diverge. Already the EU does not want it to come out, it is already a problem and therefore the fact of allying with another continent will be the drop of water that will make the vase overflow. But the chances are slim because a war right now will cause them more harm than good and none of them can afford it.
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Total votes: 17
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Total votes: 1
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The UK and the EU have complementary market interests as until now, the differences have emerged in the recent EU policy on migration from the last period not in the market for consumer goods or services. Perhaps in some areas, the food industry for example, there will be slight competitive tensions between English and Community producers but I do not think that this will advance to a trade war that would disadvantage both sides. All the producers are at this moment quite well informed about the capabilities of the partners over the English Channel and will fold on the new conditions without losing the market abroad.
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Total votes: 18
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Total votes: 1
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In my opinion, the clearest answer to this question is the UK, a free country, and CAN do what it thinks is best for its country. However, it will not provoke a trade war, at least on a large scale. If the UK had significant reasons for leaving the EU, it means that it did not agree with the main directions of its policy. That is why UK trade policy will be exactly different from EU trade policy, but will it lead to a trade war ?, probably not.
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Total votes: 17
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It is difficult to answer the question. After all, Brexit has not yet taken place, the conditions for the «divorce» of Britain and the EU are not fully known. Any conversations today are merely an expression of desires and projections. Similarly, it is possible to predict different behaviors of both the British government and the leadership of European countries after their «divorce». On the one hand, fierce competition in the trade sector does not ultimately benefit any country (an example is the economic relations of the US and China: the results of the trade war still force the authorities of these countries to agree). On the other hand, one of the trends in the development of the modern globalized economy has been the lobbying of national interests, the domination of the needs of protection of the national producer, etc. Therefore, the scenario of tougher competition (rather than trade war) between different countries, including between Britain and the EU countries, looks very likely (especially for resources).
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Total votes: 17
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I do not believe that Brexit will start a trade war between the EU and the UK. First, it is not beneficial to both parties, why spend sources on confrontation if you can cooperate peacefully. Secondly, agreements governing trade relations will be concluded. Like every country, the UK chooses what is best for them, so they understand all the risks and problems. The new trading partner will be the US, which is a positive aspect in any case.
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Total votes: 11
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I think you can cooperate and come to a conclusion; moreover, it is not to your advantage to lose certain resources when you face other problems. I do not think Brexit will start a trade war between the EU and the UK.
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Total votes: 5
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An war between UK and EU does'n serve the purpose on neither of the two. For UK, after Brexit, EU will be an market for the products that they make (they should improve their relationship, not destroy it). For EU, UK is also an market and an unique country for the goods/ organizations (like Erasmus) that can bring an benefit for the Union. Also, the trade agreements can't let the economic relations to be destroyed. I believe that cooperation and eventually new agreements can be in the benefit of both parts.
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After January 31, the British government faces the task of negotiating mutually beneficial free trade agreements with the EU, the US and a number of other countries. Boris Johnson intends to turn the UK into a global trading power after leaving the EU. A barrier to trade negotiations between the UK and the EU may be the position of the British overseas territory of Gibraltar. Gibraltar is opposed to Brexit, but is in favor of remaining in the UK without changing the status of the territory. In parallel, the UK government is conducting trade negotiations on a free trade zone with the United States, and the possibility of concluding such agreements with India, New Zealand, and Australia is being considered. There may be a conflict of interest between the US and the EU in the UK, since these countries export agricultural products and are competitors. In fact Brexit won't start a trade war between the UK and the EU because such a war would not be in the interests of anyone.
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Total votes: 7
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